Melatonin and Sleep

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Date:
Wednesday, January 1, 2014

The pattern of waking during the day when it is light and sleeping at night when it is dark is a natural part of human life. Only recently have scientists begun to understand the alternating cycle of sleep and waking, and how it is related to daylight and darkness.

A key factor in how human sleep is regulated is exposure to light or to darkness. Exposure to light stimulates a nerve pathway from the retina in the eye to an area in the brain called the hypothala-mus. There, a special center called the supra-chiasmatic nucleus (SCN) initiates signals to other parts of the brain that control hormones, body temperature and other functions that play a role in making us feel sleepy or wide awake.

The SCN works like a clock that sets off a regulated pattern of activities that affect the entire body. Once exposed to the first light each day, the clock in the SCN begins performing functions like raising body temperature and releasing stimulating hormones like cortisol. The SCN also delays the release of other hormones like melatonin, which is associated with sleep onset, until many hours later when darkness arrives.

Because melatonin is a hormone that is part of the human sleep-wake cycle, many people think that by taking more of it as a pill, it will help them to fall asleep faster or stay asleep longer. This brochure will provide more information about melatonin and help you decide whether this is something you should use.

Overall, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) recommends that if you feel a sleep problem is serious enough to treat, then you should consult your physician or find a sleep professional first to make sure you understand the cause of your sleep problem and treat it appropriately.

Melatonin is a natural hormone made by your body's pineal (pih-knee-uhl) gland. This is a pea-sized gland located just above the middle of the brain. During the day the pineal is inactive. When the sun goes down and darkness occurs, the pineal is "turned on" by the SCN and begins to actively produce melatonin, which