Sleep News

Shift work disorder can affect your health, as well as your performance and safety on the job.  

In addition to behavioral changes and good sleep habits, there are some non-medical options for improving symptoms of Shift Work Disorder. One of these options may help regulate your sleep or improve your alertness on the job.

Athletes who extended their sleep to 10 hours each night experienced improved performance and mood, according to a study presented at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. Researchers at Stanford University asked five healthy students on the Stanford women’s tennis team to maintain their normal...

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When you’re working a shift schedule, your eating and exercise habits can suffer.  People who work shifts sometimes skip meals, eat irregularly, eat unhealthy food, and may find it hard to keep...

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The 2008 Sleep in America™ poll finds that prolonged work days may cause Americans to fall asleep or feel sleepy at work, drive drowsy and lose interest in sex. Americans are working more, and the resulting sleepiness is affecting their lives both at work and at home.

Learn more about our poll results:

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In ancient societies, dreams guided political, social and everyday decisions. Early books, including the Bible, are filled with references to divine visions during sleep. On the other hand, Greek philosophers attributed dream content to natural sources, which were precursors of modern theories of dream formation...

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Getting extra sleep to overcome sleep deprivation may seem like the right thing to do, but a recent Harvard Medical School study found that it's not that easy.

The study highlights the effects of chronic sleep loss on performance and demonstrates that it is nearly impossible to "catch up on sleep" to improve performance.

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When it comes to sleep and exercise the jury is in: Working up a good sweat is an important ingredient for getting a good night's sleep. When it comes to the timing of that workout, it's a little more complicated.

AM cardio may mean more deep sleep.

When...

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Sleepwalking, formally known as somnambulism, is a behavior disorder that originates during deep sleep and results in walking or performing other complex behaviors while asleep. It is much more common in children than adults and is more likely to occur if a person is sleep deprived. Because a sleepwalker typically remains in deep sleep...

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If you are planning to vacation this summer, chances are you’ll be staying at a hotel. Although it’s fun to see new places or visit with friends and family, staying in a hotel means you are not sleeping in your own. That can be difficult for some people and can interfere with their sleep.

Here are a few tips to help you get a better...

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Women in America are getting less sleep according to NSF's annual polls and they report more sleep problems, too. But these problems pale in comparison to the sleep disruptions that occur with pregnancy.

Hayley, a former web site producer, was used to jumping out of bed, grabbing a cup of coffee and heading into the office....

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If you can't sleep and you feel tired, unproductive, or fatigued during the day, there are healthy ways to cope. The trick is to use these methods to help you feel alert and get the most out of your day, without interfering with your sleep at night.

Do you do any of the following during the day when you're tired?

  • Nap
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