National Sleep Foundation Poll Finds Exercise Key to Good Sleep: Page 4 of 6

Home >> Sleep News >> National Sleep Foundation Poll Finds Exercise Key to Good Sleep: Page 4 of 6

March 4, 2013

  • not at the expense of your sleep.
  • Create an sleep environment that is quiet, dark and cool with a comfortable mattress and pillows.
  • Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual, like a warm bath or listening to calming music.
  • Go to sleep and wake at the same time every day, and avoid spending more time in bed than needed.
  • Use bright light to help manage your "body clock." Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep to strengthen the association between your bed and sleep. It may help to remove work materials, computers and televisions from your bedroom.
  • Save your worries for the daytime. If concerns come to mind, write them in a "worry book" so you can address those issues the next day.
  • If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.
  • If you are experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness, snoring, or “stop breathing” episodes in your sleep, contact your health care professional for a sleep apnea screening.

Poll Methodology and Definitions
The 2013  Sleep in America®  annual poll was conducted for the National Sleep Foundation by WB&A Market Research, using a sample of 1,000 adults between the ages of 23 and 60. The number of completes needed for both age groups and regions was determined using the most current U.S. Census data from 2010.

The maximum sampling error of the data for the total sample is +/- 3.1 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The sampling error will vary depending on the sample size and the percentages being examined in the sample.

* Using a self-reported measure of physical activity, for which respondents considered physical activity they did for at least 10 minutes in the past 7 days, participants were classified into four different activity levels:  vigorous, moderate, light and no activity.  In this self-report measure, vigorous was defined as activities which require hard physical effort such as:  running, cycling, swimming or competitive sports.  The next level, moderate, was defined as activities which require more effort than normal such as:  yoga,