Snoring and Sleep

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you are diagnosed with this condition, it is imperative that you pursue treatment aggressively; untreated sleep apnea will lead to daytime dysfunction and puts you at a higher risk for vascular disease.

 

Your own doctor, or sleep specialist, will talk to you in detail about each of the above treatment approaches, their chances of success, possible complications, and costs. They will be able to advise you which of the above treatment approaches is the correct one for you.

COPING:

People who suffer mild or occasional snoring, who wake up feeling refreshed, and function well during the day may first try the following behavioral remedies, before consulting their doctor:

  • Lose weight
  • Avoid tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and antihistamines before bedtime
  • Avoid alcohol for at least four hours and heavy meals or snacks for three hours before retiring
  • Establish regular sleeping patterns
  • Sleep on your side rather than your back

POLL DATA:

The National Sleep Foundation's 2002 Sleep in America Poll revealed that 37% of adults report they had snored at least a few nights a week during the previous year. In fact, 27% said that they snore every night or almost every night. Males were more likely than females to report snoring at least a few nights a week (42% vs. 31%).

NSF's 2003 poll, which focused on older adults between the ages of 55-84, reveals that about one-third of older adults overall (32%) report they had snored at least a few nights a week in the past year, with about four in ten 55-64 year olds (41%) most likely to have said they snore compared to about one-fourth of 65-74 year olds (28%) and 75-84 year olds (22%). Men were significantly more likely than women to report snoring at least a few nights a week (40% vs. 26%).

Reviewed by Victor Hoffstein, M.D.