Poll Reveals Sleep Differences among Ethnic Groups

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Date:
Monday, March 8, 2010

to improve your sleep:

  • Go to sleep and wake at the same time every day, and avoid spending more time in bed than needed.
  • Use bright light to help manage your "body clock."Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep to strengthen the association between your bed and sleep. It may help to remove work materials, computers and televisions from your bedroom.
  • Select a relaxing bedtime ritual, like a warm bath or listening to calming music.
  • Create an environment that is conducive to sleep that is quiet, dark and cool with a comfortable mattress and pillows.
  • Reduce or eliminate your intake of caffeine, nicotine and alcohol.
  • Save your worries for the daytime. If concerns come to mind, write them in a "worry book" so you can address those issues the next day.
  • If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.
  • Exercise regularly, but avoid vigorous workouts close to bedtime.

Poll Methodology and Definitions
The National Sleep Foundation began surveying American sleep health and behaviors in 1991. The 2010 Sleep in America annual poll was conducted for the National Sleep Foundation by WB&A Market Research, using a random sample of 1,007 adults between the ages of 25-60 and identifying themselves as White, Black/African-American, Asian or Hispanic. This poll has adopted the group definition used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Census Bureau, and related public health groups; while NSF also acknowledges that this is an imperfect description of race and ethnic groups. No effort was made to verify the accuracy of the respondent's self-identification. Individuals from other ethnic groups were excluded from participating. The Sleep in America Poll Task Force did consider economic factors in analyzing the data. The margin of error is 3.1 percentage points at the 95% confidence level.

2010 Sleep in America Poll Task Force
Sonia Ancoli-Israel, Ph.D. (Chair)
Professor of Psychiatry
Director, Gillin Sleep and Chronomedicine Research Center
Department of Psychiatry
University of California, San Diego

Daniel P. Chapman, Ph.D.
Epidemiologist
National