National Sleep Foundation Responds to Reports of Drug Use for Insomnia in Michael Jackson's Death

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Date:
Thursday, July 2, 2009

Washington, DC, July 2, 2009: The tragic death of Michael Jackson has raised public concerns over insomnia treatments, as recent reports speculate that Propofol might have been used to treat his insomnia. Propofol is not a sleep aid, but an intravenously-administered, controlled drug used by anesthesiologists during surgery. It can only be administered by a licensed healthcare professional, and any time it is used the patient must be continuously monitored. It is inconceivable that any licensed medical professional would administer Propofol to treat insomnia.

"If Mr. Jackson was suffering from insomnia, there are several highly effective and safe medications available to treat it," said Thomas Balkin, PhD, Chairman of the National Sleep Foundation. "Approved insomnia medications, including Ambien CR (zolpidem), Lunesta (ezopiclone) and Rozerem (ramelteon) are widely available and prescribed to thousands of Americans every day."

The National Sleep Foundation advises patients never to use drugs that are not FDA-approved for insomnia and never to use someone else's pills. Those with severe and persistent insomnia are urged to see a sleep specialist.

For more information on insomnia, please visit www.sleepfoundation.org.

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Contact: Jennifer Cowher,
Marketing and Communications Manager
Tel: (202) 347-3471 x.211
Email: jcowher@sleepfoundation.org

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