National Sleep Foundation Launches Air Purification Product for the Bedroom

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Date:
Thursday, January 14, 2010

National Sleep Foundation Partners With Austin Air Systems

WASHINGTON, DC, January 14, 2010 -- The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is pleased to announce its partnership with Austin Air Systems, a leading indoor air cleaner manufacturer, to launch a new National Sleep Foundation-branded air purification system specifically designed for the sleep environment. The National Sleep Foundation Bedroom Machine by Austin Air will make its debut at the Big Sleep Show in Washington, DC on January 16, 2010.

Developed and designed by Austin Air, the National Sleep Foundation Bedroom Machine will use an advanced HEPA filter system, designed to remove common bedroom pollutants, such as cooking gasses, dry cleaning chemicals, and other airborne irritants and allergens. The unit was selected for use in a new Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health study on asthma and bedroom air quality and a number of University of Buffalo studies on environment and asthma.

"The National Sleep Foundation is pleased to introduce the first bedroom product to carry the National Sleep Foundation name," said David M. Cloud, NSF's Chief Executive Officer. "This is a very advanced bedroom air purification system, made by one of the most-respected manufacturers in the industry. We are proud to be working with the experts at Austin Air to make the National Sleep Foundation Bedroom Machine available so people can breathe cleaner air as they sleep."

"There are huge implications for our collaboration," said Richard Taylor, Founder and President of Austin Air Systems, adding "Respiratory illness is one of the primary causes of sleep disturbance. The medical evidence coming out of the research now provides the most compelling argument possible of the necessity of clean air in promoting healthy sleep."

A Johns Hopkins study, published in the February 2009 edition of Environmental Health Perspectives, found an association between high levels of indoor particulate matter pollution and the severity of asthma symptoms among children.

"The results of the recent Johns Hopkins study are important," says Thomas Balkin, PhD, Chairman of the National Sleep Foundation's Board of Directors. "The potential health benefits of improving bedroom air quality, particularly when people are reclining in