My Child Has Trouble Sleeping, What Now?

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My baby won't stop crying, and I can't get her to sleep. Of course, I can't sleep either. What can I do?

Keep in mind that some babies cry a total of 3-4 hours per day, which can feel like an eternity. From birth until your baby is several weeks old, the best advice may be to ask your friends or family for help (this is a good time to schedule that visit from a relative) and to try and sleep when the baby sleeps. Eventually at 2-3 months, you can help your baby differentiate night from day by keeping your baby active and in a light room during the day and the opposite at night. When you're ready, you can help your little one learn to self soothe and to sleep through the night. The key to this is to pick a consistent bedtime and allow your baby to fall asleep independently (with as little help as possible). In time, your baby will develop the skills s/he needs to fall asleep and stay asleep without you.

What should I keep in mind when setting up the nursery?

The ideal sleep environment should be a cool yet comfortable temperature, quiet, and dark. Let's face it though; many parents are faced with creaky floors, crying siblings, or an otherwise noisy house. Consider using a white noise machine or even just a loud fan to block out nighttime sounds. If the nursery is near a street lamp or is especially light, consider room-darkening shades. For infants it is most important to minimize blankets, pillows, and other fluffy items in the crib in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Also remember that babies should be put on their backs to sleep.

I get home very late from work. Is it wrong to let my baby stay up so I can see him?

It is tough for many working parents who worry about developing healthy bonds with their children. Remember that relationships are formed whenever you are with your child, not just at night. It